Thursday, 25 August 2011
Long-term immigration: 575,000 (mostly useless third-worlders)
Long-term immigration: 336,000 (mostly decent British people)

This is demographic warfare. There is a net loss of Britishness of about 1,000,000 people each year. That's almost 2% of the population. How long can Britain sustain becoming 2% less British each year?
The increase from 198,000 in 2009 was fuelled by a fall in the number of people leaving the UK and goes against the Government's pledge to bring net migration down to the tens of thousands by 2015.

Long-term immigration was 575,000, similar to the levels seen since 2004, while long-term emigration fell to 336,000 from 427,000 in 2008, estimates from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed.

Study remained the most common reason for those coming to the UK, with three in four of the 228,000 who come to the UK for study coming from outside the EU.

But the number of people coming to the UK for a definite job was at its lowest in more than six years, at 110,000.

And the number of those leaving the UK for work-related reasons was at its lowest for three years at 179,000, the ONS estimates showed.The increase from 198,000 in 2009 was fuelled by a fall in the number of people leaving the UK and goes against the Government's pledge to bring net migration down to the tens of thousands by 2015.

Long-term immigration was 575,000, similar to the levels seen since 2004, while long-term emigration fell to 336,000 from 427,000 in 2008, estimates from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed.

Study remained the most common reason for those coming to the UK, with three in four of the 228,000 who come to the UK for study coming from outside the EU.

But the number of people coming to the UK for a definite job was at its lowest in more than six years, at 110,000.

And the number of those leaving the UK for work-related reasons was at its lowest for three years at 179,000, the ONS estimates showed.

The number of people granted settlement in the UK reached a record 241,000 last year, partly due to the number of people being allowed to stay as the backlog of asylum cases was cleared, other figures published by the Home Office showed.

Work-related grants of settlement also reached a record last year of 84,000, reflecting high numbers admitted for work five years earlier.

But figures for the first half of this year showed an 8 per cent fall in the number of people being granted settlement, down to 208,000, with falls in both the work and family categories.

A total of 195,000 people were granted British citizenship last year, down from the record high of 204,000 in 2009 but more than double the level of a decade earlier.

The number of people applying for asylum also fell in 2010, but has started to rise again this year with 4,800 applications between April and June, up 9 per cent from the same quarter in 2010, mainly due to an increase in applications from Pakistan and Libya, the figures showed.

Immigration Minister Damian Green said: "After almost two years of increasing net migration the figures stabilised in the last quarter.

"This explains why the Government radically changed immigration policy, from our first months in office, to drive the numbers down with a limit on economic migration and changes to student visas to ensure we attract the brightest and best whilst tackling widespread abuse of the system.

"We are currently consulting on a range of further measures which will drive down numbers further.

"These statistics cover a period before we introduced our radical changes to the immigration system to bring net migration back down to the tens of thousands."
Source: Daily Telegraph

Another detail from the Guardian account:
Immigration removals or voluntary departures stood at 11,388 between April and June 2011, the lowest level since data started to be published in 2001.

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